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eBook The True History of Chocolate (Second Edition) download
Cookbooks
Author: Sophie D. Coe
ISBN: 0500286965
Subcategory: Cooking Education & Reference
Pages 288 pages
Publisher Thames & Hudson; Second edition (October 29, 2007)
Language English
Category: Cookbooks
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 355
ePUB size: 1599 kb
FB2 size: 1306 kb
DJVU size: 1401 kb
Other formats: txt lrf lit azw

eBook The True History of Chocolate (Second Edition) download

by Sophie D. Coe


Not only is this a great book to learn about the history of chocolate but it is a great history lesson about Mesoamerica.

His books include The Maya, Mexico, Breaking the Maya Code, Angkor and the Khmer Civilization, and Reading the Maya Glyphs. He lives in New Haven, Connecticut. Not only is this a great book to learn about the history of chocolate but it is a great history lesson about Mesoamerica. 4 people found this helpful.

Sophie D. Coe was an anthropologist and food historian. Coe presents the history of chocolate as a story, in the sense that the reader follows the origins of cacao from an indigenous Mexican crop to one of the most popular commodities of the 20th century

Sophie D. Michael D. Coe is Professor Emeritus of Archaeology and Curator Emeritus in the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale University, and is the author of the bestselling Breaking the Maya Code, also published by Thames & Hudson. Coe presents the history of chocolate as a story, in the sense that the reader follows the origins of cacao from an indigenous Mexican crop to one of the most popular commodities of the 20th century. While Coe's style may turn of of the more serious academic reader, the history is never deluded or overly simplified.

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Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The True History of Chocolate. The Coes are well prepared to write such a definitive history; the late Sophie had both a culinary and an anthropological background, while Michael has written extensively on pre-Colombian civilizations. The result is a superbly written, charming, and surprisingly engrossing chronicle of a food and how its development has touched the lives of cultures around the world.

A beautifully written. and illustrated history of the Food of the Gods, from the Olmecs to present-day developments. The Spanish conquest of Central America introduced chocolate to Europe, where it first became the drink of kings and aristocrats and then was popularized in coffeehouses.

The first two chapters about chocolate in the Mayan and Aztec culture were This book was chalk full of facts and information, but Coe's writing style left something to be desired. It was too academic; often lacking clarity and coherence. Thus, he's writing this book as a sort of tribute to his wife. I think that's sweet (no pun intended).

Books related to The True History of Chocolate.

A new final chapter on a Guatemalan chocolate producer, located within the Pacific coastal area where chocolate was first invented, brings the volume up-to-date. Books related to The True History of Chocolate. Coe. Publication date. Canon EOS 5D Mark II. City. Coe is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Yale University. Her book America's First Cuisines was published in 1994 to universal acclaim. His books include The Maya, Mexico, Breaking the Maya Code, Angkor and the Khmer Civilization, and Reading the Maya Glyphs. Bibliographic information. The True History of Chocolate. Coe, an anthropologist and food historian, was the author of America’s First Cuisines

Sophie D. Coe, an anthropologist and food historian, was the author of America’s First Cuisines. Professor Michael D. Coe is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and Curator Emeritus in the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale University. His books include The Maya, Reading the Maya Glyphs and Mexico and The True History of Chocolate, all published by Thames & Hudson. Reading the Maya Glyphs. Coe, Mr Mark Van Stone Out of stock. Breaking the Maya Code. £1. 5. Mexico (Ancient Peoples and Places). Coe, Rex Koontz.

Complete history of Chocolate. I bought this book thinking that it would be a fun book to read with my middle school son. This book was written by Sophie and Michael Coe, and is more of a reference book than a "fun book for 13 year olds". However, if you are interested in everything chocolate and cacao, than this may be for you. It explores in depth and factual the origins of cacao, how it was taken to Europe, facts about the cacao tree and how to cultivate it, all the way to modern chocolate manufacture. 268 pages with 97 illustrations. Наиболее популярные в Научная литература.

"A beautifully written...and illustrated history of the Food of the Gods, from Olmecs to present-day developments."―Chocolatier.

This delightful and best-selling tale of one of the world's favorite foods draws upon botany, archaeology, and culinary history to present a complete and accurate history of chocolate. The story begins some 3,000 years ago in the jungles of Mexico and Central America with the chocolate tree, Theobroma Cacao, and the complex processes necessary to transform its bitter seeds into what is now known as chocolate. This was centuries before chocolate was consumed in generally unsweetened liquid form and used as currency by the Maya, and the Aztecs after them. The Spanish conquest of Central America introduced chocolate to Europe, where it first became the drink of kings and aristocrats and then was popularized in coffeehouses. Industrialization in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries made chocolate a food for the masses, and now, in our own time, it has become once again a luxury item. The second edition draws on recent research and genetic analysis to update the information on the origins of the chocolate tree and early use by the Maya and others, and there is a new section on the medical and nutritional benefits of chocolate. 100 illustrations, 15 in color
Puchock
A fascinating and fact-filled account of the history of chocolate from its Mayan origins to its reception in Europe during the early 1500s, the changing nature of its production and marketing to the present day and the major players in this - religiously, socially and culturally. This is such an engaging and interesting read. Filled with information about early Meso-America and an unflinching portrait of the Conquistadors and their role in the later dissemination of chocolate, never mind the cultural atrocities perpetrated on the people they encountered in South America, the book then travels to Europe and the reader learns of the role this rich and heady drink played among first, the cultural elite, before finding its way to the stomachs and hearts of the masses. The role of slavery is touched upon and my only critique is I would have liked to read more on this. Otherwise, this book is the seminal book on the history of the product we've come to know and mostly, love devouring.
Ghordana
Sophie and Michael Coe have written a emminently readable history of chocolate. They emphasize the origins of cacoa in the New World, and the Spanish conquerors' response to their "discovery" of cacoa. The story fascinates, and I liked how the authors presented all the options when historical records were scarce or contradictory. The text is interspersed with clarifying illustrations, some are in color. The 19th and 20th centuries are covered in brief. The book ends with the resurgence in deluxe chocolates that use the rarer yet better tasting cacoa beans, and explains why these chocolates are so much better tasting than the supermarket candy bar. All in all, an excellent read.
Era
This book tells a magnificent story of how a small good seen everyday, chocolate, has impacted all of history. To my surprise, it was loaded with lots of data and history you would never imagine for such a common item. The authors did a superb job in presenting a subject not thought about throughout the modern world. The origins of chocolate have a very interesting history that is again, not considered in the modern era. The author delivers their information in an interesting way and makes readers want to continue to read due to its surplus of interesting and unknown facts.

I would recommend this book to other students because it tells a fascinating story of a boring item. Students can learn many things from this novel such as the impact of trade or interactions between humans. They can also see the effects of cultural diffusion from different goods in the world. The only thing I had wished the author had done was add more personal thoughts or opinions on their information to give students something to discuss about.
EROROHALO
Coe's The True History of Chocolate is a blending between genres, while not entirely a textbook it is still very informative and well written. Coe presents the history of chocolate as a story, in the sense that the reader follows the origins of cacao from an indigenous Mexican crop to one of the most popular commodities of the 20th century. While Coe's style may turn of of the more serious academic reader, the history is never deluded or overly simplified. Coe's style aside, this book still contains a wealth of information about the impact of chocolate on both Europe and America. If you have ever been curious about chocolate but never studied it, this is a must read. I recommend this book to readers of non fiction and those who simply enjoy learning about history, the only readers who may want to avoid this book are those that enjoy denser and more serious academic texts.
Ohatollia
This is a thoughtfully written account of the better-researched history of chocolate. It has been updated in a new edition. I bought the older edition because I'm cheap, and was replacing a book I had lost. If you are interested in linguistics, as I am, you can use work cited in this book to locate new research papers and stay current on this subject.
You can find information that dispels some of the bogus lore floating about on the Web about chocolate. There is much.
I'd like to see somebody write a chapter on the various species of flowers that the Aztecs used to flavor chocolate; I have forgotten two of them, and only see vanilla noted in most people's writing on the subject. Incidentally, there are multiple species of Vanilla in the chocolate homelands, with one set of four species still existing in some old plantations in the Yucatan of Mexico, and a different set of four, with overlap, existing in some old plantations in Guatemala. The various flowers to not impart the same aromas and flavors! Vanilla planifolia is merely the dominant flavor source for most commercially farmed vanilla, and provided the chemical reference for the synthetic vanillas. However, the genetic background on Tahitian Vanilla indicates a hybrid, and I'm not certain that the source for the second parent that is not V. planifolia is a settled subject.
Zeks Horde
Entertaining reading, florid prose, lots of interesting if cherry-picked facts, but sweeping generalizations combined with incomplete analysis make this a disappointing book.
Longitude Temporary
Not only is this a great book to learn about the history of chocolate but it is a great history lesson about Mesoamerica.
If you love chocolate, you have to learn all about it and this book provides some useful perspectives.