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eBook The Eucharist in the Reformation download
Christians and Bibles
Author: Lee Palmer Wandel
ISBN: 0521856795
Subcategory: Theology
Pages 314 pages
Publisher Cambridge University Press (December 19, 2005)
Language English
Category: Christians and Bibles
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 890
ePUB size: 1648 kb
FB2 size: 1633 kb
DJVU size: 1429 kb
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eBook The Eucharist in the Reformation download

by Lee Palmer Wandel


Lee Palmer Wandel offers a very welcome comparative study of Eucharistic practice. Lee Palmer Wandel's the The Eucharist in the Reformation investigates an aspect of the theological debates of the sixteenth century that the scholarship on the Reformation often neglects.

Lee Palmer Wandel offers a very welcome comparative study of Eucharistic practice. this book is very valuable for its impressive scholarship, its innovative and evenhanded comparative approach, its emphasis on the variations of Eucharistic teaching and practice within each of the major churches.

Lee Wandel focuses on the consequences of the different interpretations of these simple words in the delineation of the . Welcome to the Reformation. I know many Catholics who think 'Holy Communion' or the Eucharist is a replication of the biblical story in the upper room.

Lee Wandel focuses on the consequences of the different interpretations of these simple words in the delineation of the Lutheran, Reformed, and Catholic traditions. Finally, Wandel argues that the incarnation is at the cente This study traces the evolution of the words, "this is my body," "this do," and "remembrance of me" that divided Christendom in the sixteenth century. It is a symbolic re-telling Many Christians, of all strips, take a small wafer of bread, and/or a sip of wine to re-enact the events of the Last Supper.

by Lee Palmer Wandel.

The Eucharist in the Reformation: Incarnation and Liturgy takes up the words, 'this is my body', 'this do', and 'remembrance of me' that divided Christendom in the sixteenth century.

The rest of the book uses Scotland as a case study for a multidisciplinary .

The rest of the book uses Scotland as a case study for a multidisciplinary investigation of the place of liturgical interpretation in this culture. The book demonstrates an important continuity across the Reformation divide arguing that the "Scottish Reformation" is best seen as both Catholic and Protestant, with the reformers on both sides having more in common than they or subsequent historians have allowed.

Article in Journal of Reformed Theology 9(2):209-210 · January 2015 with 4 Reads. Cite this publication. Sumana Chattopadhyay.

Published by Cambridge University Press, 2006. Condition: Good Soft cover. From Books Express (Portsmouth, NH, . Price: US$ 10. 3 Convert Currency.

Читать бесплатно книгу The Eucharist in the reformation. Reformation Lord's Supper - History of doctrines Eucharist Реформация - История Евхаристия. Incarnation and liturgy (Wandel L. и другие произведения в разделе Каталог. Доступны электронные, печатные и аудиокниги, музыкальные произведения, фильмы. На сайте вы можете найти издание, заказать доставку или забронировать. Возможна доставка в удобную библиотеку. The Eucharist in the reformation : incarnation and liturgy, Lee Palmer Wandel. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2006.

This study traces the evolution of the words, "this is my body," "this do," and "remembrance of me" that divided Christendom in the sixteenth century. Lee Wandel focuses on the consequences of the different interpretations of these simple words in the delineation of the Lutheran, Reformed, and Catholic traditions. Finally, Wandel argues that the incarnation is at the center of the story of the Reformation and suggests how divergent religious identities were formed.
WtePSeLNaGAyko
Poor use of sources of serious scholarship. Clear the author is viewing these events from the outside, as something of an art historian. In the inyterese of saying something ":new" she misses the forest for the trees. Sad waste of time.
fr0mTheSkY
Lee Palmer Wandel's the The Eucharist in the Reformation investigates an aspect of the theological debates of the sixteenth century that the scholarship on the Reformation often neglects. Focusing on the sixteenth century's various understandings of the nature of the Eucharist, she claims that this book "seeks to illuminate the many different ways sixteenth-century western Christians understood the relationship: between their persons and Christ; between objects of the mundane world and God; and among what they did in worship, their faith, and God Incarnate" (2). The bulk of her book is analyses of the Lutheran, Reformed, and Catholic formulations of the Eucharist.

Wandel argues that these various understandings of the Eucharist were formative in the religious upheaval of the sixteenth century because these disparate views led men and women to different understandings of the Incarnation and different understandings of their relationship to that Incarnation. Though views on the Eucharist certainly divided Christendom, Wandel might infer too much. At the end of the book she writes, "And so, for each Christian, those who did not partake of Christ's body in the way that he or she did, no longer shared the same body [sic]. They were, indeed, not human in the same way" (262). Wandel implies that this difference of opinion facilitated the acrimonious and often bloody struggle between Europeans in the sixteenth century. This idea of perceived differing humanities seems a bit speculative. Instead of differing humanities, the various groups used the Eucharist to delineate between regular Christians, irregular Christians, and heretical Christians. Of course, some people did not acknowledge the existence of irregular Christians; all those who did not hold to the same understanding of the Eucharist were simply heretics. Wandel seems to need this idea of differing humanities to explain the sixteenth-century willingness to kill for religion. In the sixteenth century, this willingness to kill over religion, which is foreign to the modern mind, would not need the justification that Wandel presents. This justification seems to be designed for twentieth-century slaughters.

In spite of some of Wandel's speculations, the The Eucharist in the Reformation is a helpful book which illuminates the importance of this theological dispute, which became a rallying cry for all sides in the Reformation.