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eBook Listening for the Soul: Pastoral Care and Spiritual Direction download
Christians and Bibles
Author: Jean Stairs
ISBN: 0800632397
Subcategory: Christian Living
Pages 224 pages
Publisher Fortress Press; 1St Edition edition (August 1, 2000)
Language English
Category: Christians and Bibles
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 694
ePUB size: 1427 kb
FB2 size: 1483 kb
DJVU size: 1710 kb
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eBook Listening for the Soul: Pastoral Care and Spiritual Direction download

by Jean Stairs


This book by Jean Stairs addresses a need in pastoral care and ministry - the attentiveness to the soul that so many people, ministers and laypersons alike, can find the love, support and care they seek in church and community

This book by Jean Stairs addresses a need in pastoral care and ministry - the attentiveness to the soul that so many people, ministers and laypersons alike, can find the love, support and care they seek in church and community. The world is crying out for the church to be more like the church,' Stairs states in her introduction, 'to represent the space and place where holiness, meaning, and God can be found, experienced, understood and reimagined.

Listening for the Soul book. While her discussion of pastoral care and spiritual direction is enlightening, I do not think Stairs ever fully forms her thoughts in two areas that seemed central to her book: 1) What is the difference between pastoral care and spiritual direction? And, secondarily, is there a difference between the two?

This book explores the relationship between the practices of pastoral care and the practices of spiritual direction with the aim of enabling pastoral caregivers to draw upon the guiding principles, resources and techniques of spiritual direction within the Christian tradition. With an emphasis on both "practice" and "presence," the book reclaims the tradition of "soul care" for the pastoral ministry, thereby complementing the medical, or crisis intervention, model of pastoral care with a wellness/growth model of pastoral care.

Listening for the soul: Pastoral care and spiritual direction. The practice of spiritual direction is first described and compared to pastoral counseling and psychotherapy

Listening for the soul: Pastoral care and spiritual direction. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress. Summa theologiae: Latin text and English translation, introductions, notes, appendices, and glossaries. The practice of spiritual direction is first described and compared to pastoral counseling and psychotherapy. Then eight functions of spiritual direction are presented and compared to similar "functions" in psychotherapy.

My know Gary since 2007, and always been Impressed for his great listening and discerning skills.

My know Gary since 2007, and always been Impressed for his great listening and discerning skills always has been a great and caring shepherd, so I know he is a great pastoral counselor.

This book by Jean Stairs addresses a need in pastoral care and ministry - the attentiveness to the soul that so many people, ministers and laypersons alike, can find the love, support and care they seek in church and community

This book by Jean Stairs addresses a need in pastoral care and ministry - the attentiveness to the soul that so many people, ministers and laypersons alike, can find the love, support and care they seek in church and community.

Spiritual direction is the practice of being with people as they attempt to deepen their relationship with the divine, or to learn and grow in their own personal spirituality. The director listens and asks questions to assist the directee in his or her process of reflection and spiritual growth.

Spiritual direction is a practice of Christian soul care that is found most notably in the Catholic, Orthodox and Episcopal traditions but is also present in Wesleyan/Holiness, tic, social justice and Reformed.

Spiritual direction is a practice of Christian soul care that is found most notably in the Catholic, Orthodox and Episcopal traditions but is also present in Wesleyan/Holiness, tic, social justice and Reformed communities. Gary W. Moon, David G. Benner. InterVarsity Press, 20 сент.

This book explores the relationship between the practices of pastoral care and the practices of spiritual direction with the aim of enabling pastoral caregivers to draw upon the guiding principles, resources, and techniques of spiritual direction within the Christian tradition. With an emphasis on both Âpractice and Âpresence, the book reclaims the tradition of Âsoul care for the pastoral ministry, thereby complementing the medical, or crisis intervention, model of pastoral care with a wellness/growth model of pastoral care.

Listening for the Soul: ÂChallenges clergy to take seriously the relationship between pastoral care and spiritual direction. ÂIntegrates theological and psychological insights with issues of spiritual life and formation. ÂIncludes a chapter on the spiritual formation of children. ÂProvides practical guidance for integrating spiritual direction with pastoral care. ÂTends to the pastoral caregivers own needs for spiritual deepening. ÂIncludes reflection questions and case studies to enable the text to function on both the individual reader and classroom levels.

elektron
Got this for my nephew and he loved it,
Mavivasa
This is an amazing book and should be read by anyone who desires to develop their listening skills. This should be a mandatory reading for all who are in pastoral care.
Wrathmaster
I have been going through this book and each page and each chapter has new information about what it means to listen to the soul. It is more and deeper than I ever thought.
Nahelm
bought as a gift
Nalmezar
This book by Jean Stairs addresses a need in pastoral care and ministry - the attentiveness to the soul that so many people, ministers and laypersons alike, can find the love, support and care they seek in church and community. 'The world is crying out for the church to be more like the church,' Stairs states in her introduction, 'to represent the space and place where holiness, meaning, and God can be found, experienced, understood and reimagined.' This book is written largely for a Protestant audience, although there are insights to be gained by those who are Anglican, Roman Catholic and Orthodox (and, to a lesser extent, some from outside the Christian realm, although the book is primarily written for an internal Christian audience).

Stairs highlights the loss in Protestant circles of many of the spiritual aspects still honoured and available in the more liturgical churches - ideas of spiritual direction and other structures are still present there, but Protestant theology and practice views them with suspicion, for various reasons. One is the distrust of anything that moves away from a sense of sola scriptora or Christ-alone kinds of theologies. Another is a fascination with mainstream psychology and a misplaced trust in the idea of therapeutic cures being substitutes for spiritual care and direction. However, people still yearn for spiritual care and fulfillment.

Part of this can be done in the actual practice of spirituality beyond the usual course of study - it isn't enough simply to read about spiritual practices, but rather one must incorporate these and do them. At my seminary, first-year students were expected to take a course that would cover in brief a successive selection of Christian spiritual practices; many students would come to seminary not only with having nothing outside of their own denomination as experience, but sometimes with nothing outside of their own congregation. There were always those students who found the course a waste of time - these were invariably the ones who read through the material, but never actually worked through the practices. However, for many if not most students, it was an awakening to the different ways of being authentically Christian in practice that can be incorporated into already existing theological and historical frameworks.

Stairs' text shows many different ways of incorporating spiritual practices. I notice the word 'listen' a lot in her text, both in titles and the body of the essays - the word 'Listen' is the first word of the Benedictine rule, one of the time-honoured practices in Christian history. Stairs incorporates the idea of spirituality and spiritual practice into everyday life and work, into family and individual processes, into formal life events, and into church and worship experiences.

The case study in the appendix is a wonderful postscript to Stairs' development of ideas. It recounts the experience of two women who founded a Sunday school programme, who shortly thereafter contracted cancer; one lived, and the other died. How does one deal with this kind of situation? Where is the attentiveness to the soul going to take place in the midst of this kind of happening? Stairs' gentle spirit covers it well.

This is a wonderful book - it is a must read for ministers, clergy and lay, who provide pastoral care and spiritual care for people in their community, and for anyone who wants to heighten his or her sensitivity to the connections and the differences in pastoral care and spiritual direction, and how these can be applied to one's own life.
Scream_I LOVE YOU
I am taking my time with this book...but as I progress, I keep adding to my pastoral care. It has opened up some new and refreshing aspects to make me a more understanding care giver. It's a good book for pause and reflection.
Brick my own
One of the best books I have read on the subject. Gets to the heart of pastoral care. Has a somewhat mystical bent.
This is an amazing, reflective, practical resource for pastors. A must have for those just beginning and those seeking refreshment. Stairs is realistic and challenging. Excellent!