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eBook Hearing Mark's Endings: Listening to Ancient Popular Texts Through Speech Act Theory (Biblical Interpretation Series) download
Christians and Bibles
Author: Bridget Gilfillan Upton
ISBN: 9004147918
Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference
Pages 258 pages
Publisher Brill Academic Publishers; 1st Edition edition (January 2006)
Language English
Category: Christians and Bibles
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 202
ePUB size: 1839 kb
FB2 size: 1135 kb
DJVU size: 1945 kb
Other formats: lit txt lrf docx

eBook Hearing Mark's Endings: Listening to Ancient Popular Texts Through Speech Act Theory (Biblical Interpretation Series) download

by Bridget Gilfillan Upton


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Hearing Mark’s Endings has two foci: it represents an attempt to show that ancient popular texts are written to be. .The book concludes that Speech Act Theory has, indeed, much to offer to the interpretation of these texts

Hearing Mark’s Endings has two foci: it represents an attempt to show that ancient popular texts are written to be read aloud, and further, develops an aurally attuned hermeneutic to interpret them by. The contents of the book include rhetorical readings of the ancient popular texts, by Xenophon of Ephesus: An Ephesian Tale, and the ending of Mark’s Gospel. The book concludes that Speech Act Theory has, indeed, much to offer to the interpretation of these texts. The particular usefulness of this work lies in the contribution it makes to New Testament hermeneutics, in the testing of a particular, underused methodology to illuminate ancient popular literature.

Hearing Mark's Endings: Listening to Popular Ancient Texts through Speech Act Analysis. Speech act analysis and New Testament interpretation with special reference to G. N Leech's pragmatic principles

Hearing Mark's Endings: Listening to Popular Ancient Texts through Speech Act Analysis. Structure and Meaning in the Fourth Gospel. N Leech's pragmatic principles. Pages 129-142 in Text and Interpretation: New Approaches to the Criticism of the New Testament. Du Plessis, J. G. 1991.

Personal Name: Gilfillan Upton, Bridget . Publication, Distribution, et. Leiden ; Boston Biblical interpretation series, 0928-0731 ; 9. General Note: Originally presented as the author's thesis (P. Download book Hearing Mark's endings : listening to ancient popular texts through speech act theory, by Bridget Gilfillan Upton.

by Bridget Gilfillan Upton , Hearing Mark's Endings: Listening to Ancient Popular Texts Through Speech Act Theory more. by Bridget Gilfillan Upton. Publication Date: Jan 1, 2006.

by Bridget Gilfillan Upton. In this paper I attempt a new reading of the passage found in 1 Timothy . -15, to try to show how it might be read by women today more. -15, to try to show how it might be read by women today. Hearing Mark's Endings: Listening to Ancient Popular Texts Through Speech Act Theory more.

The Setting and Rhetoric of Mark's Gospel (Biblical Interpretation, 65; Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2003).

Telford, W. R. (2007). The Setting and Rhetoric of Mark's Gospel (Biblical Interpretation, 65; Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2003). Journal of Theological Studies 58: 206-214. Telford, W.

by Bridget Gilfillan Upton · data of the book Hearing Mark's Endings . details (United States). ISBN: 978-90-04-14791-1. ISBN-10: 90-04-14791-8. Brill Academic Publishers · 2006.

Hearing Mark's endings. Published 2006 by Brill in Leiden, Boston Biblical interpretation series,, 79, Biblical interpretation series ;, v. 79. listening to ancient popular texts through speech act theory. Published 2006 by Brill in Leiden, Boston. Biblical interpretation series,, 79, Biblical interpretation series ;, v. Classifications.

Hearing Mark's Endings has two foci: it represents an attempt to show that ancient popular texts are written to be read aloud, and further, develops an aurally attuned hermeneutic to interpret them by. The contents of the book include rhetorical readings of the ancient popular texts, by Xenophon of Ephesus: An Ephesian Tale, and the ending of Mark's Gospel. These readings, which highlight the aural nature of the texts, are followed by a methodological justification for using Speech Act Theory as a hermeneutical tool, and further readings, of Xenophon's romance, and three endings of the Gospel of Mark. The book concludes that Speech Act Theory has, indeed, much to offer to the interpretation of these texts. The particular usefulness of this work lies in the contribution it makes to New Testament hermeneutics, in the testing of a particular, underused methodology to illuminate ancient popular literature. It will prove to be useful to all those interested in interdisciplinary methodological studies of biblical and other ancient popular literature.