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Christians and Bibles
Author: Daniel P. Fuller
ISBN: 0310533007
Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference
Pages 508 pages
Publisher Zondervan (May 1, 1992)
Language English
Category: Christians and Bibles
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 364
ePUB size: 1913 kb
FB2 size: 1102 kb
DJVU size: 1964 kb
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eBook The Unity of the Bible: Unfolding Gods Plan for Humanity download

by Daniel P. Fuller


Professor Daniel P. Fuller raises questions concerning the unity of the Bible which few are willing to as. I found the book interesting as it tells God's plan for humanity using redemption as the axis upon which all is built.

Professor Daniel P. Fuller raises questions concerning the unity of the Bible which few are willing to ask. His interesting findings will provoke serious study of the Bible for all those who seek to edify the church and train men and women for positions of leadership. No book besides the Bible has had a greater influence on my life than Daniel Fuller's Unity of the Bible. The book furthered greatly my knowledge of the Old Testament and it's numerous preparations to assist followers in better understanding the New Testament. It is truly all about unity.

Dr. Daniel P. Fuller is Emeritus Professor of Hermeneutics, Fuller Theological Seminary, 1993 to present. Библиографические данные.

The Unity of the Bible represents Daniel Fuller’s lifelong effort to understand and expound this purpose by seeking the Bible’s answer to questions such as these. It is written especially to equip laypersons to carry out both evangelism and edification, and it will also help all Christians to put the Bible together to grasp the whole purpose of God (Acts 20:27. Dr. The Unity of the Bible: Unfolding God's Plan for Humanity. Biblical theology deals with the overall characteristics of God and the Bible and the divine plan for creation. It is often compared and contrasted to the more popular systematic theology, which is narrower and themed, dealing with individual subjects such as tithing or the Law. I look at biblical theology This is the third or fourth book I have read about biblical theology.

Daniel Fuller has given his life to seeing the connections and pursuing the coherence of 'the whole counsel of Go. " . " -John Piper "A rich mine. Professor Daniel P.

Unfolding God’s Plan for Humanity. The Unity of the Bible. No book besides the Bible has had a greater influence on my life than Daniel Fuller’s The Unity of the Bible. When I first read it as a classroom syllabus over twenty years ago, everything began to change. The hallowing of God’s name (Matthew 6:9) flamed up as the center of my prayers. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 10 years ago. Book is a good book for my reference libraty. His interesting findings will provoke serious study o. . Author Bio. ▼▲.

Publication: Zondervan Publishing House, 1992Description: 508 . SBN: 0-310-53300-7. Отношение к Ветхому Завету, Bible. Dewey: 22. F85Subject: Библия - Критический анализ, интерпретация (толкование)/ Bible - Criticism, interpretation, etc Библия. Relation to the Old Testament. Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title.

Daniel Payton Fuller (born August 28, 1925 in Los Angeles, California) is the only child of radio evangelist Charles E. Fuller, the co-founder of.The Unity of the Bible: Unfolding Gods Plan for Humanity, Zondervan (May 1992). Gospel and Law: Contrast or continuum?

Daniel Payton Fuller (born August 28, 1925 in Los Angeles, California) is the only child of radio evangelist Charles E. Fuller, the co-founder of Fuller Theological Seminary, and his wife Grace Payton Fuller. Following in his father's footsteps Fuller became a theologian and later joined the faculty at Fuller Theological Seminary. After graduation from South Pasadena High School in 1943, Fuller enlisted in the United States Navy and became a commissioned officer. He was discharged in 1946. Gospel and Law: Contrast or continuum?

The unity of the Bible is a primer on doing biblical theology through the "arching" principle, or taking the Bible as a coherent and unified whole, in order to understand the unified teachings of the Bible.
Fordrekelv
This is the third or fourth book I have read about biblical theology. I think Fuller has handled the subject well and provided a great overview of the subject in a relatively short textbook. Biblical theology deals with the overall characteristics of God and the Bible and the divine plan for creation. It is often compared and contrasted to the more popular systematic theology, which is narrower and themed, dealing with individual subjects such as tithing or the Law. I look at biblical theology as the macro-view of God’s plan and systematic theology as the micro-view. I utilize both in my studies and writings, and I think both are beneficial. There is no war between them. In some circles, biblical theology is referred to as “salvation history” or “redemptive history” due to its overarching focus on the story of God culminating in the redemption of all creation and the following earthly reign of Christ in the restored world; some forget the wonderful things that happen after all evil is destroyed, acting as if God’s ultimate house-cleaning is the end of the story—don’t be one of them.

Fuller provides a view of progressive revelation, moving more or less chronologically through the text. This makes sense as it is easy for students to comprehend chronologically-arranged material. I say “students” because this is, indeed, a textbook, and a good one. The book is well-made and easy to navigate as one would expect from a Zondervan product. There are notes and review questions at the end of each segment and a bibliography, general index, and scripture index at the end.

In Part I, Fuller does what one would expect for a textbook as he sets out to explain terms and reasons in order to explain why he has written and one should read the book. He lays out the canonical legitimacy of the Bible, which is important to accept as all of his material is going to be based upon and supported by scripture. He includes a couple of apologetic segments herein about Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam, though I am not sure why. I agree with his arguments, but I do not understand what these have to do with a biblical theology.

In Part II, the foundations of redemptive history are laid out. Fuller uses both testaments as evidence. He promotes and uses an inductive approach, trying to view scripture in light of the author’s intent, which I think is the proper starting point. He grapples with the concepts of the Trinity, the Fall, Hell, the Cross, Heaven, and other fundamental (this word in its original meaning) issues of the Christian faith.

In Part III, Fuller examines Israel’s role as the “lesson book,” as he terms it, or the example, as I would term it, to the world. Major themes herein are forgiveness of sins, the ceremonial Law, and the concepts related to the kingdom of God in an Old Testament context. The idea of national/ethnic Israel as the “light to the gentiles” is an important concept many Christians have missed out on, and it can be a fairly difficult concept to understand. It is, however, important, and the Christian does not want to remain ignorant about this characteristic of God’s chosen people.

In Part IV, the focus is upon the New Testament purpose and presence of Jesus. As we currently live within the modern world, Fuller addresses contemporary life within the biblical context. Further, he deals with the (predominantly future) conversion of Israel.

Overall, I think Fuller has done a great job to deal with such a large subject in such a short text. He makes the error of confusing the Roman Catholic religion as Christian—falling for or assuming the “branches of Christianity” concept we are fed by the “establishment”. I do not know why he does this. He has the sense to recognize Hinduism, etc. are distinct religions, and he has the biblical training to understand that the Roman Catholic religion does not qualify as a biblical religion. Perhaps the error lies in an ignorance not of the Bible, but of the faith in question. In any case, I took away one star for this as I feel this is a tragic error as it encourages Christians to mistakenly think the very large R. Catholic Church consists of saved people, which is not at all the case. This results in them not being considered for missionary activities, which puts souls at risk.

As I mentioned above, biblical theology is a huge topic. Those wanting more information may want to consider To Know and Love God by David K. Clark (dense) and/or The Ways of Our God: An Approach to Biblical Theology by Charles H. H. Scobie (less dense than Clark but longer; be careful here as Scobie uses elements of the apocrypha as foundational). I definitely recommend The Mission of God’s People: A Biblical Theology of the Church’s Mission by Christopher J. H. Wright. This latter text has a succinct working with the concept of Israel as God’s example to the nations.

This is a textbook, but all Christians or even non-Christians studying some or all elements of biblical theology can benefit from the book. Fuller is very qualified to write about the subject. Further, the far more popular systematic theology of writers and pastors has resulted (coincidentally, I think) in many Christians being unfamiliar with the overall biblical theology of Our Lord, which is not a good thing. We should be familiar with both the big picture and the details. Highly recommended. Note that this review is for the 1992 edition and there is a more recent version available.
Unnis
Daniel Fuller's book "The Unity of the Bible" is a keeper. I found the book interesting as it tells God's plan for humanity using redemption as the axis upon which all is built. The book furthered greatly my knowledge of the Old Testament and it's numerous preparations to assist followers in better understanding the New Testament. It is truly all about unity. The book is a tad hard to read but well worth the effort. A keeper for my apologetics bookshelf.
Oso
The following sentence alone persuaded me to purchase and read Daniel Fuller's The Unity of the Bible, "No book besides the Bible has had a greater influence on my life than Daniel Fuller's Unity of the Bible." Penned by John Piper, this recommendation convinced me that reading this work was a worthwhile investment of my time. I'm neither the most prolific nor the speediest reader I know, so plowing into this 460 page work was a lengthy endeavor for me. I really enjoyed this book, though, it taught me much, and it's very clear to see how it influenced Piper's theology and teaching.

In sum, this book is basically a primer on biblical theology, covering the storyline of the entire Bible and its unifying themes. Having focused almost exclusively on systematic theology during my seminary years, the study of which I thoroughly enjoy, this was a really refreshing way to view Scripture as the one unified book that it is. The book is divided into four parts: 1) The Value of the Inquiry (for the unity of the Bible); 2) The Foundations of Redemptive History; 3) Israel, The Lesson Book for the Nations; and 4) The Gospel Goes to the World.

The first part is "The Value of the Inquiry (for the unity of the Bible)." This introductory part lays the groundwork for viewing scripture as an integrated whole by giving evidence for the Bible's unity through the Old and New Testament canons. It then defines some of the essential elements for formulating a biblical worldview and contrasts that with the works-based worldviews of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam. Thus, this section clearly reveals that all of the Bible teaches salvation by God's grace through faith in Jesus Christ from beginning to end.

The second part is "The Foundations of Redemptive History." In this section, Fuller more fully explores the account of the Fall of man and the entrance of sin into humanity in the book of Genesis. This is followed by a look at the nature of God, including His being a Trinity, his work of creation, and his purpose for humanity. Then, Fuller looks at the reason for justness of an eternal hell, followed by an exploration of the riches of God's mercy from the cross of Jesus (my favorite chapter), and God's promise to protect the seed of his chosen people.

The third part is "Israel, the Lesson Book for the Nations." This section looks at the life of Abraham, the purpose of the Old Testament Law, and the Kingdom of God in the Old Testament. One of Fuller's main points is that as in the New Testament, God's chosen people are reconciled to Himself by faith in God, which is evidenced by consequential works of obedience. Such a message of eternal salvation is directly opposed to a hopeless and non-biblical perspective that salvation is achieved through faith, supplemented by necessary obedience and works, the sum of which might earn one a righteous standing before God.

The fourth part is "The Gospel Goes to the World." This last part of the book examines the Kingdom of God during the life of Christ and the early church, in our current world, and in the future. A key point in this section is that Jesus Christ desires to save all people around the world whom he has elected, regardless of race, lineage, or geographical location. Fuller completes this section by discussing the future conversion of those Jews alive at the time of Christ's return.

I really enjoyed Fuller's The Unity of the Bible, and it helped me understand better that the One and Only God is the author of all the Bible, that He is the creator of all things for His Glory, and that we can be saved into a relationship with Him only by faith in the grace he offers us through the life, death, resurrection, and exaltation of Jesus Christ. While this book definitely has much theological depth to it, I found myself often reading it as devotional reading. If you have not read a basic primer on biblical theology, this is the book for you!
Daizil
This was a wonderful book. It was full of insight into scripture and offers an overview that is appropriate for leadership of the church. The questions at the end of each chapter will inspire conversation.
Gholbirdred
Not an easy read, but some great stuff here
Xarcondre
very imformative
Rolling Flipper
Excellent
This was a gift to my husband, he loves this book!